artblackafrica:

Tanzanian artist Rehema Chachage (Dar es Salaam, 1987) creates video, sculptural, performance and image installations which explore the theme of gender, identity, voicelessness and alienation. She graduated in 2009 with a BFA from Michaelis School of Fine Art, University of Cape Town. Her artistic pieces make use of ritualization, subversion and tension, reflecting the four years she spent in South Africa as a ‘cultural foreigner’ and as a black female student in a predominantly white middle-class setting.

Mizizi/Nasaba explores the state of bereavement and the politics of gender in African society when it comes to inheritance. It consists of digital prints that document a relationship between a bereaved daughter and the text that was left behind by her deceased father—which is her only true inheritance since all material inheritance (according to beliefs in most African society) is ‘ideally’ left behind for the male subjects in the family. - Rehema Chacage on her work, pictured above.

For when you are feeling a bit unsure about the future. #onlyonMondaystho

dynamicafrica:

The World War I in Africa Project Sheds Light On An Often Forgotten Part of History.

As a student of history for all my years of secondary education, I can’t say that I never learned about World War I, the events leading up to it as well as the aftermath it had on Europe and to some extent the United States. Perhaps we never delved into it in quite as much depth as we did World War II, but even then, I’d be hard-pressed to think of time where my history teacher (bless her soul) ever mentioned the impact that the First World War had on Africa and Africans. Such a truth wouldn’t concern me if the circumstances were different; if I wasn’t at a school in an African country, if I weren’t an African myself, if I wasn’t one of five black students in a history class of over 20, if I didn’t come from a country that was colonized by the British (who, as history goes, love war).

But all these things were and still are a part of who I am, and it is for these reasons – and so many more, that the World War I in Africa project is incredibly important learning for me. Even beyond the personal connection of history and heritage, the ignorance of many to the involvement of Africans in World War I and the integral roles the played speak to a much broader concern of the omission and reduction of black people and Africans in many important events in Western history.

It’s been 100 years since the First World War began. 100 years since the first shot fired by British troops occurred in what is today known as Togo, on August 7th, 1914. 100 years gone by and still, the world is yet to actively include and universally commemorate the lives of the estimated two million Africans who in some way contributed to the efforts of their colonial empires during this bitter war of the 1910s. World War I was indeed what its title refers to it as – a war that saw involvement on a global scale.

From the Gold Coast to German East Africa, Algeria to the southernmost tip of Africa, a new initiative is bringing to light the forgotten ways in which European politics brought the Great War to African homes. Through the efforts of World War I in Africa project, we are provided with a multimedia database that both highlights and archives the ways in which African lives were affected by a war they had no agency in. Because what happens in Africa should be told around the world.

World War I in Africa.

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And just as we have seen an unprecedented centralisation and concentration of capital globally, so we are seeing a similar process amongst development NGOs with ever larger global enterprises such as Oxfam, SCF, ActionAid, Care, World Vision, to name but a few, being formed with every larger volumes of funds. Many of these Northern aid agencies have now set up offices in Africa so as to be perceived as organisations of the South – as if geographic location changed anything. They now have the power to do deals directly with African governments and to speak on behalf of ‘civil society’. Backed with resources far exceeding those of local organisations, they are able to play the missionary role to a far greater extent than before. They offer no challenge to the neoliberal agenda – indeed, their income depends on not contesting that ideology. Instead, many of them collude with the multinationals by giving a ‘progressive’ cover to them through programmes of ‘corporate social responsibility’: for example, several Canadian NGOs have been given huge sums for social programmes such as building schools and health centres in areas where extractive industries are mining oil or other mineral resources while destroying the environment. Their silence on the role of these extractive industries is not hard to understand. If the missionaries of the past were part of the machinery of colonial domination, today’s missionaries are part of the machinery of exploitation by multinational corporations and finance capital. In that sense, then, I think the situation is worse than before.

Firoze Manji

Read more here: http://thinkingafricangos.blogspot.ca/2014/08/the-missionary-position-ngos-and.html

It was the development NGOs, heavily funded by the aid agencies, that moved in to privatise social welfare, to provide the sweetener for neoliberalism, to occupy the mental universe by telling the neo-colonised that development, not emancipation, was what they needed, that the key task was ‘fighting poverty’ not fighting the looting that was the principle feature of neoliberalism. And in so doing, they play the vital service to capital of depoliticising poverty. For them the problem is ‘poverty’, not the political and economic processes that results in mass pauperisation. They perform this role much as the missionaries of the past did: by eliminating any reference to history. People are just poor. There is no question of explaining how they became poor. It is the ‘native condition’. In the past the native was uncivilised. Today, they are judged to be under-developed.

wwiafrica:

A rarity among rarities: a photo of a Senegalese tirailleur (sharpshooter) with woman and child in Marseille, France. 1914.
Find out more about World War I in Africa.

wwiafrica:

A rarity among rarities: a photo of a Senegalese tirailleur (sharpshooter) with woman and child in Marseille, France. 1914.

Find out more about World War I in Africa.

Remembering the East Africa campaign like it was

wwiafrica:

Among World War I campaigns, the East African one was the longest of all: as the armistice was being signed in Europe on November, 11th 1918, the last of the German forces were still fighting their British counterparts. Indeed the general who led them only surrendered two weeks later, on November, 25th 1918.

But who knows any of this, whether in America, in Europe or indeed in Africa? As the world commemorates the Centenary of the Great War, the African side of this story remains a footnote, despite huge losses of human lives and major consequences for the future of the African continent.

thelastedition:

C R I M S O N
Jeneil Williams by Julia Noni for Vogue Deutsch
Red palm leaves - unknown

thelastedition:

C R I M S O N

Jeneil Williams by Julia Noni for Vogue Deutsch

Red palm leaves - unknown

Introducing the #WWIAfrica project

"The story of Africans’ involvement in the Great War is unheard of outside of academia, and thus remains to be told: the tens of thousands of African lives lost at home and abroad, defending the interests of foreign powers and the lives of complete strangers; the forced recruitment of African soldiers to fight Europe’s war, and of African workers to replace the labour force gone to the front; the battles between colonies pitting Africans against each other on their own soil; the reshaping of Africa’s borders and inner workings after the war under new rulers."

(Source: wwiafrica)

derica:

On Saturday 9th August at 3PM, THE FUTURE WEIRD presents REMOTE CONTROL at the Museum of Arts and Design’s MAD Biennale, in association with Spectacle Theater
REMOTE CONTROL is a program of short films concerning witches & bitches – women who see, take, and sell things they cannot grasp. Whether they wield powers to possess, or are somehow controlled, the technologies these films document are deployed without regard for reciprocity or consent. 
Presenting shorts by Zina Saro WiwaFyzal Boulifa and Shola Amoo, we’re talking possession, surveillance, “brain to brain interface”, and the human use of human beings. 
THE FUTURE WEIRD is a screening series dedicated to speculative, experimental and weird film by directors from Africa and the Global South. 
WHEREMuseum of Arts and Design, 2 Columbus Circle
WHEN: Saturday 9th August 2014 @3PM
TIX: $10/$5 concessions

(via ladyfresh)

thisislagos:

NEW FLYER

SIMPLY BECAUSE THIS FLYER IS EVERYTHING UNDER THE SUN!

thisislagos:

NEW FLYER

SIMPLY BECAUSE THIS FLYER IS EVERYTHING UNDER THE SUN!

Well worth the wait!! @justaband’s newold? oldnew? video: Probably for lovers #Kenyafeelthelove

Follow them here justabandwidth

Inspired by @chichiagram rocking @shopsoko  (at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)

Inspired by @chichiagram rocking @shopsoko (at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)

Live from Bongoland: The Story of Tanzania's Music Economy

In the 70’s and 80’s, the east African nation of Tanzania was home to one of the continent’s greatest music scenes. But you wouldn’t know from the recorded evidence. Join us for this Hip Deep Edition of Afropop Worldwide, as we explore how Tanzania developed a booming music economy without any music industry (and yes- we’ll explain what that means) and then how, in the course of a single decade, it developed one of the premier recording industries on the continent. Featuring professor Alex Perullo, and veteran guitarist John Kitime. Produced by Sam Backer.

Tanzania womens jazz band

msadjei:

Earlier this year I did a concept shoot for Ghana based clothing label Osei Duro (www.oseiduro.com). It was shot at Labadi Beach in Accra by amazing artist and photographer Kenturah Davis. The concept idea came from Marion Payen, a French visual artist, who wanted the shoot to have a “nomadic feeling with an outer space vibe.”

I had a great time and we had lots of spectators who were fully intrigued with our use of flour and Tang ( yes the drink Tang) at the beach. Without the camera i’m sure they would have easily assumed there was some ancestral ritual going on.